The Dingle Experience

The Journey Continues

Two nights in Dingle were relatively dry and the sun popped out for a bit. We started off with a walking tour of the community with Steven and his Irish Wolfhound. Truly a novelty to tour with a classic dog of the region, the guide was good too! (http://stephenmcphilemy.com)

The small seaside community became known after ‘Ryan’s Daughter’ was filmed on the Dingle peninsula and released in 1970. Shops and pubs line the seaside community painted in various colors. It is the quintessential cozy community for shopping and tourism, complete with local artisans and a local dolphin named fungi. We were able to watch glass cutting with a local artisan. Although the tourists may not know it, the major economy areas are fishing and dairy. A lot of grass fed beef and sheep roam the lands. And, late at night the Spanish fishermen come in with their bounty and refrigerate to ship to northern Spain for restaurant and market sales.

We also rode on Slea Head Drive, a harrowing experience with narrow roads, switchbacks and cliffs. We are blessed with a seasoned driver who managed the drive without breaking a sweat. The views were breathtaking on this drive to the Blasket Islands Center.

We hiked around the Blasket Island Center (https://web.archive.org/web/20141028173551/http://www.heritageireland.ie/en/blascaod/) and enjoyed the fresh air and views of the Atlantic. The center itself has the largest stain glass display in Ireland (https://www.jamesbrownphotography.com/dingle-peninsula-1?lightbox=dataItem-ixj3l1a24). After learning about the literature and historical significance of the area we continued on our drive to Gallatus Oratory. One of the most impressive, mortar free stone buildings I have ever seen. This is a pre-reformation Catholic chapel (https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gallarus_Oratory).

Rain free touring in Ireland, great learning and a gift of occasional sunshine.

The bonus limerick

In Ireland we embraced the green

Alan weaved in and out of the scenes

The roads were crazy

The sky’s were hazy

The guides and the locals were quite keen

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